WORKSHOPS

Plenary sessions and workshops are described below.

Plenary – Intimate Partner Homicide, Then and Now: Reflections From An Expert In the Field

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN

Monday, November 2, 8:30 – 9:45am

Ballroom, 4th Floor

Intimate partner homicide is one of the leading causes of premature death for women in the United States.  Helping women accurately assess her risk for lethality at the hands of an abusive partner so that life-saving interventions can be implemented has become one of the foundations for curbing this staggering epidemic.  Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell is a leader both nationally and internationally in the fields of domestic violence and intimate partner homicide. With over thirty years of expertise, her studies have paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary investigations and practical implications by researchers and practitioners in the fields of nursing, medicine, social work, criminal justice, public health, and domestic violence advocacy. In this session, Dr. Campbell will reflect on her early, ground-breaking work in the field; discuss her identification of lethality risk factors and her development of the Danger Assessment; and share the most current research on intimate partner homicide and lethality prevention strategies.

Plenary – Transformative Change

Jay Otto

Monday, November 2, 10:15 – 11:30am

Ballroom, 4th Floor

Driving change is challenging and critically important to improving the health and safety of our communities. Jay Otto, a researcher with the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will share three lessons about change learned in working with communities seeking to improve health and safety. These lessons have broad application and can be applied to the implementation of the Domestic Violence High Risk Team (DVHRT) Model℠. This session will prepare participants for understanding the process of leading transformative change in their community.

The Domestic Violence High Risk Team (DVHRT) Model℠: The Basics and Beyond – Part 1 & 2

Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center

Part 1: Monday, November 2, 1:00 – 2:30pm
AND Tuesday, November 3, 10:00 – 11:30am

Ballroom, 4th Floor

Part 2: Monday, November 2, 3:00 – 4:30pm
AND Tuesday, November 3, 1:15 – 2:45pm

Ballroom, 4th Floor

The Domestic Violence High Risk Team (DVHRT) Model℠ was born from one community’s tragedy and has gone on to national recognition and replication as a leading strategy for intimate partner homicide prevention. This presentation will provide a comprehensive understanding of the Model with an overview of the research at its foundation. The function and structure of key partners in this multidisciplinary approach will be discussed. Participants will learn how team members work together to identify high risk cases and mobilize risk management strategies. The inspiring outcomes of successful DVHRTs will be shared.

Beyond “Just the Facts, Ma’am” – Trauma Informed Response to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Crimes – Part 1

Justin Boardman, Donna Kelly

Monday, November 2, 1:00 – 2:30pm
AND Tuesday, November 3, 1:15 – 2:45pm

Suffolk Room, 3rd Floor

Do you understand the difference between lying and the effects of trauma on a person’s ability to describe events? This understanding is critical for criminal justice professionals working with victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Tragically, victims’ accounts are often called into question because their descriptions of events may sound vague, inconsistent or even untruthful. But what is so often misunderstood is that trauma triggers a complex set of neurobiological reactions that affect a victim’s ability to recount their story in a clear and detailed way. Without this perspective, victims are often disbelieved, which compounds their trauma and hampers criminal investigations. In this presentation, Justin Boardman and Donna Kelly will provide a trauma informed lens to criminal justice response by walking the audience through the basic scientific concepts regarding the neurobiology of trauma, in the context of victim response to violent crimes.

Profile of Killers–Intelligence on Men Who Murder Their Intimate Partners

David Adams

Monday, November 2, 1:00 – 2:30pm

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

In this presentation we will review research findings on risk markers of domestic homicides, including David Adams’s study of men who kill their intimate partners. This session will include profiles of five different types of killers, based on in-depth interviews with men who have murdered their intimate partners as well as victims of attempted homicide. Guidelines for domestic violence danger assessment and risk management strategies will also be discussed.

Safety Planning for Our First Responders

Mark Wynn

Monday, November 2, 1:00 – 2:30pm

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

This workshop examines the complexities and challenges faced by officers when interacting with offenders, victims, and witnesses and identifies tactics and protocols for ensuring officer, victim, and civilian safety, and presents quantitative research and case studies to demonstrate the dangers of responding to and managing on-scene investigations of domestic violence calls.

Danger Assessment Certification

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN

Monday, November 2, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

The Danger Assessment is a 20-question tool that can be used by advocates to determine the level of danger an abused woman has of being killed by her intimate partner. The presentation gives background information about the development of the tool and its importance to anyone interacting with abused women.  Dr. Campbell will review the weighted scoring of the tool, which is vital to accurately determining the level of danger for the abused woman. Participants will be eligible for certification to administer the Danger Assessment tool upon completion.

Trauma Informed Victim Interviews – The How To’s – Part 2

Justin Boardman, Donna Kelly

Monday, November 2, 3:00 – 4:30pm
AND Tuesday, November 3, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Suffolk Room, 3rd Floor

The West Valley City Police Department and the Utah Prosecution Council have created and implemented a new interviewing protocol for cases where victims have experienced a traumatic event. The new protocol incorporates the core principles of the neurobiology of trauma, explored in Part I, with the goal of enhancing the trauma informed response of criminal justice professionals. In this presentation, Justin Boardman and Donna Kelly will review the new interviewing protocol and explain the “how-to’s” of interviewing trauma victims. The presentation will include discussion of both the initial interview at the scene of a crime (often in conjunction with danger assessment), and of the later, in-depth forensic interview. They will present the results of a one-year pilot study of their interviewing protocol, which show a dramatic increase in both prosecution rates and positive impact on the interviewed victim’s healing process. This presentation is quick-paced, interactive and includes video clips from real victim interviews.

What Should Happen and What You Should Expect from an Effective On-Scene Investigation

Mark Wynn

Monday, November 2, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

Through the use of interactive participation, case studies, and re-enactments, the participants will view the incident and crime scene through the eyes of the investigating officer. On completion of this session, the participants will understand the five objectives of an on-scene investigation, interviewing techniques, victim behaviors and offender motivation.

Schenectady, New York Domestic Violence High Risk Team

Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center, Schenectady, NY DVHRT Team Members

Tuesday, November 3, 8:00 – 9:30am

Ballroom, 4th Floor

In 2014, Schenectady, New York implemented a Domestic Violence High Risk Team (DVHRT) with training and consultation from the Jeanne Geiger Crisis Center. In this presentation, members of the Schenectady DVHRT discuss the process of starting a team and share their impressive results produced to date. A case presentation will provide a practical understanding of how a DVHRT creates individualized intervention plans. Team members will review how the DVHRT has impacted their community and continues to drive positive change in their entire domestic violence response system.

Strangulation: What Is It? Why Do We Care? And How Do We Prove It? (Part 1 & 2)

Kelsey McKay

Part 1: Tuesday, November 3, 8:00 – 9:30am

Suffolk Room, 3rd Floor

Part 2: Tuesday, November 3, 10:00 – 11:30am

Suffolk Room, 3rd Floor

This two-part workshop will provide a comprehensive look at intimate partner strangulation. It is recommended that both sessions be attended together. The first part will provide participants with a better understanding of how strangulation is different from all other types of intimate partner assault, both physiologically in terms of its lethal danger, as well as the emotional effect it can have on the victim. The session will discuss the relationship between domestic violence and strangulation and how to better investigate both crimes together. It will look deeper into the type of perpetrator who strangles their partner. Finally, this session will discuss defensive injuries and help the audience interpret these so that a victim is not accidentally arrested. The second workshop will focus on how to prove this often missed and misunderstood crime by discussing overlooked physical injuries and identifying non-visible signs and symptoms of strangulation. The session will guide law enforcement through the process of utilizing a strangulation supplement and discuss how its use will strengthen the quality and quantity of evidence in these cases. It will walk prosecutors through the process of translating this evidence for a jury in order to obtain a successful prosecution by offering tips for voir dire, discussing the use of medical experts and utilizing demonstrative evidence.

Advocates’ Guide to Using and Interpreting the Danger Assessment: Danger Assessment Tool – Advanced

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN

Tuesday, November 3, 8:00 – 9:30am

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

As the Danger Assessment Tool has become widely used by advocates in the field, questions have arisen about how to interpret and respond to the questions. In this presentation, Dr. Campbell will provide a deeper understanding of the risk indicators and provide guidance on more nuanced aspects of administering the tool with victims, including using the calendar and interpreting answers. Dr. Campbell will provide participants with actual quotes from advocates who have completed the DA with survivors as well as the Advocates Guidelines to Using and Interpreting the Danger Assessment. This workshop would be best suited for advocates with some level of experience using the Danger Assessment.

Best Strategies for Probation Supervision with High Risk Offenders

James E. Henderson, MSW CAC-R

Tuesday, November 3, 8:00 – 9:30am

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

Probation officers play a key role in holding offenders accountable by assessing the context of their violent behavior and making recommendations for appropriate sanctions to the court. Their recommendations can advance or impede safety for victims well beyond the violent incident. This session will examine the role of probation officers in facilitating safety and accountability of high risk offenders and the potential for improved outcomes through the Domestic Violence High Risk Team and collaboration with community partners.

Countering Witness Intimidation: Forfeiture by Wrongdoing

John Wilkinson

Tuesday, November 3, 10:00 – 11:30am

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

Intimidation and manipulation are integral parts of every abuser’s arsenal of power and control. Intimidation may have prevented a victim from calling the police in the past, and once criminal charges have been filed, the level of intimidation and manipulation often ramps up as the abuser attempts to evade accountability. Where intimidation is successful in preventing the victim from testifying in court, the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing can be used to admit the victim’s out-of-court statements. Where intimidation results in the victim’s recantation, minimization, or testimony for the defense, the prosecutor can use evidence of intimidation to charge additional offenses or to argue it as evidence of consciousness of guilt. This presentation will focus on minimizing opportunities for intimidation, recognizing it when it occurs, preserving evidence of intimidation, and using such evidence to successfully prosecute abusers.

Realities of Intimate Partner Violence in the Immigrant Community and the Danger Assessment for Immigrant Women (DA-I)

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN

Tuesday, November 3, 10:00 – 11:30am

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

Despite the growing population of immigrant women in the United States and their greater vulnerability to intimate partner violence, there is limited research on how risk of lethality is different for this population. This presentation will focus on the Danger Assessment-Immigrant (DA-I), a tool developed to assess the risk of homicide and future severe violence among abused immigrant women. Dr. Campbell will present her research, identifying the unique issues when working with communities of color and provide an overview of the cultural realities to consider when working with immigrant victims. She will also provide an update on the validation process for the DA-I. This session will explore what we know about the homicide rate in immigrant and other marginalized communities and how current homicide reduction approaches have been successful.

Lunch Session – Suffer from Burnout? Give ’em the F.I.N.G.E.R.!

Mark Yarbrough

Tuesday, November 3, 11:30am – 1:00pm

Ballroom, 4th Floor

This workshop will discuss burnout, which affects millions of Americans each year and has been called “the disease of our civilization.” Professionals who help protect children have a high risk of developing burnout. But there’s good news—burnout can be healed. The presenter, a former 20-year elected district attorney, personally experienced burnout and then conquered it. He has since become a “burnout expert” and has written and published on the subject and has taught thousands of people how to overcome burnout. Attendees will be laughing, and at the same time learning Mark’s F.I.N.G.E.R. philosophy to help themselves or their co-workers avoid and/or recover from burnout. This is a training that you won’t want to miss!

Identifying the Predominant Aggressor & Evaluating Lethality

John Wilkinson

Tuesday, November 3, 1:15 – 2:45pm

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

Every year 3-4 million women in the U.S. are abused and 1,500-1,600 are killed by their abusers. One challenge for first responders to a domestic disturbance where both parties are injured is identifying the predominant aggressor. Police and prosecutors must be able to determine the level of danger facing a victim. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of homicide in domestic violence relationships. While we cannot predict what will happen in a particular case, danger assessments can help determine the risk that a victim faces, enabling us to better prioritize our efforts and support the victim.

This presentation will emphasize the importance of contextual analysis in evaluating criminal responsibility at the arrest, charging, pre-trial, and sentencing phases. The presentation will also discuss the importance of danger assessments and best practices in lethality evaluation.

Assessing Risk Assessment

Liberty Aldrich, Hon. Janice M. Rosa, J.S.C. (New York, Ret.)

Tuesday, November 3, 1:15 – 2:45pm

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

This practical session will explore the social science behind lethality and risk assessment, and offer some tools and suggestions for court-based risk assessment. Over the past several years, researchers have successfully identified factors associated with higher risk of lethality or re-offense at the hands of an intimate partner. What is the court’s role in identifying risk in domestic violence cases? When and how can court staff, attorneys, and judges get the information they need to respond safely and appropriately to litigants in order of protection, divorce or other custody cases?

The Domestic Violence High Risk Team Model: Is Your Community Ready?

Kelly Dunne & Patricia Hohl

Tuesday, November 3, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Ballroom, 4th Floor

This presentation will build on core concepts learned in the two-part workshop, The Domestic Violence High Risk Team Model: The Basics and Beyond, where participants will have begun to determine if the DVHRT Model is a good fit for their community. This presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the five-step DVHRT replication process and the foundational elements a community must establish prior to implementation. Tips to get your community ready to implement the Model and upcoming opportunities to apply to be one of the next DVHRT replication sites will be discussed. Please note: This presentation will not be repeated.

Skills to Navigate Change

Jay Otto

Tuesday, November 3, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Wellesley Room, 3rd Floor

Following up on his plenary talk, Jay Otto will lead a deeper exploration of how to prepare for, initiate, and navigate true transformational change. Participants will begin to develop skills that will support their change efforts in their communities. This is session is designed for participants who are planning to lead their community through a DVHRT implementation. This session will be interactive and will involve individual exercises as well as small group engagement.

Going Forward Without the Victim: Evidence-Based Prosecution of Domestic Violence

John Wilkinson

Tuesday, November 3, 3:00 – 4:30pm

Provincetown Room, 4th Floor

A recurring issue in prosecuting domestic violence cases is whether and how the victim will testify at trial. Many domestic violence victims are subject to intense pressures –including intimidation and manipulation—that discourage them from participating in criminal prosecution. And even when such victims do testify, they may recant prior statements, minimize the level of violence of the defendant’s culpability, or even testify on behalf of the defendant. These cases can still be prosecuted successfully.

This presentation will examine evidence-based prosecution techniques that will enable prosecutors to try domestic violence cases where the victim is an absent or reluctant witness. The presenter will discuss tools and strategies for successfully prosecuting these difficult cases and the practical steps necessary to achieve success. The presentation will also focus on effective investigative techniques for documenting and securing evidence that will prove the elements of the offense, as well as the trial strategies, including the use of expert testimony to explain victim behavior that enables the jury to return a guilty verdict regardless of whether or how the victim testifies.